1. Translate MedTech supports COVID-19 Innovation Response Hackathon

    Translate MedTech were proud supporters of the MedTech Foundation’s recent COVID-19 Innovation Response Virtual Hackathon, which ran between Friday 3 April and Sunday 5 April and sought to address critical health-related issues resulting from COVID-19.

    How it worked

    123 potential innovators (64 academics, 38 medical students, 12 industry representatives and 9 NHS doctors) gathered to address challenge topics ranging from hospital care and public health to health education and digital training.

    Participants were split into multi-disciplinary teams, connected via online messaging, teleconferencing and file sharing platforms, and asked to each submit a project proposal and business canvass by the end of weekend.

    Hackathon outcomes

    The project teams successfully generated 12 unique solution concepts by the end of the virtual hackathon.

    In the 11 days since, the following has been achieved:

    • Development has begun on three digital solutions, each of which is now at beta-stage for preliminary testing (one solution, MedWise, can be found online here).
    • One project team is due to submit an application for collaborative development funding imminently – if successful, further development will begin immediately.
    • Another team has finished developing a data collection app to help the Cambridge Clinical Trials Unit collect data for their COVID-19 research.

    William Bolton, NHS Doctor and MedTech Foundation Co-Founder said “This was the first hackathon we have run virtually, and I was unsure if it would work. I am pleased to report it went better than expected. The teams really took to it and there was so much interdisciplinary collaboration contributing to the fight against COVID-19.

    It’s a timely reminder that working with different disciplines is essential in medtech, and now we know that we can do this virtually, it opens up a whole new direction for the MedTech Foundation.

    Our work isn’t possible without the continued support of our long-term partners. A huge thank you goes particularly to Translate MedTech and the NIHR Surgical MIC for their support in delivering this hackathon and moving the ideas forward.”

    Future opportunities to get involved

    The MedTech Foundation team hope to run more virtual innovation workshops and hackathons in the coming weeks. If you’d like to be involved, follow MedTech Foundation on Facebook or Twitter to be among the first to know when a new activity is launched.

    We are continuously updating our website with opportunities for medtech innovators to provide support for frontline healthcare workers, click here to learn more.

  2. Delivering Enterprise Training – virtually

    This post was written by Viadynamics, the team that delivered Translate MedTech‘s recent Business Case Planning and Pitching training course. They wrote about their experience of adapting their course for virtual delivery on short notice.

    We wanted to share this with our community as we feel it’s important to showcase examples of people successfully adapting to the current challenging circumstances in order to deliver innovation support within the region.

    We are currently working with our delivery partners to understand whether upcoming Translate MedTech courses can also be delivered virtually. If you would be interested in taking part, you can still browse the courses on our website and register your interest.


    Like organisations the world over, the Viadynamics team is now working virtually to safeguard our people – and to continue our mission to make innovation and enterprise happen. We have all located to our various home-offices, adapting to the ‘new normal’ – and finding new ways of working creatively and productively.

    We hope you are all well and safe, and that you too are managing your way through the lockdown, both personally and professionally.

    Over the last few years we have been delivering a range of enterprise training courses and seminars to academics and students. For the most part these have been face-to-face events, where delegates bring their own projects, and work on them throughout. 

    We believe in ‘learning by doing’ – building enterprise capability while accelerating and de-risking opportunities.  We use a variety of frameworks, relevant examples and group work – and it’s a formula that works, with consistently positive feedback.

    We recently ran our first full-day virtual enterprise workshop using an online video collaboration platform with a cohort of academics from six Universities in the Leeds and Sheffield City Regions.

    Leveraging features including virtual break-out rooms and other online tools, we were able to come really close to achieving the interactive face-to-face workshops that we love to run. 

    We judged it a success, as did our client Translate MedTech.  We would particularly like to thank Mohua Siddique and Danielle Miles for taking the leap of faith with us and sticking to the plan for delivering the course as scheduled, as well as the delegates for participating so actively in this ‘experiment’. 

    Here are some examples of delegates’ take on the day:

    The use of [virtual conferencing platform] worked well and the breakout room function was great’

    It was a really good event and glad you still delivered it – keep up the good work!

    Extremely useful guidelines and tools to assess a potential business opportunity….useful for academics to get exposed to the business side’.

    We are keen to do more!  To chat through how we might be able to support your Institution – or indeed if you are planning to run an interactive training event and would like us to share some top tips, please do contact us

    We can set up a videoconference, demonstrate some of the features we have found particularly useful, and explore how we might be able to support you in this ‘new normal’.


    About Viadynamics

    Viadynamics has over twenty-one years’ experience of helping global businesses, start-ups, universities, GOs and NGOs to address innovation opportunities, challenges and dilemmas.

    They design and deliver training courses, seminars and accelerator programmes to up-skill people and accelerate opportunities. They also provide mentorship, market specialists and domain experts to new and growing ventures.

    You can learn more about them on their website here.

  3. Interventional X-ray expert seeks new test tool

    Translate MedTech’s Secondment Scheme is designed to develop the innovation skills and translational capability of medical technology researchers in the Leeds City Region. This blog is part of a series that showcases the impact that secondments have had on medtech research, as recounted from the secondee’s perspective.

    Due to the success of the scheme, it is being run again in 2020. To find out how to apply for Translate secondment funding for your medtech research, click here.


    Name: Dr Amber Gislason-Lee
    Host organisation during the secondment: Guys and St Thomas' Trust
    (London) and UZ Leuven (Belgium)

    My name is Dr Amber Gislason-Lee and I teach medical imaging science and technology to radiography students at the University of Bradford’s School of Allied Health Professionals.

    My background is in medical physics, which puts me in a unique position to teach this topic and to contribute to research in medical imaging.

    I previously worked under the mentorship of Arnold Cowen, who designed the original Leeds Test Objects before they were bought by a commercial company outside of Leeds. 

    One area of research which I have many years of experience in is interventional X-ray imaging. For that reason, I am on a working group for the Institute of Physicists and Engineers in Medicine (IPEM) to write a quality assurance (QA) guidance document for medical physicists testing interventional X-ray systems.

    This guidance document has been challenging for the group to write, one of the main reasons being a lack of X-ray test object to mimic the motion of a human heart, to check for temporal and spatial resolution of the X-ray system at hand.

    These aspects of image quality allow for better accuracy in treating patients via angioplasty, radiofrequency ablation and other life-saving interventional cardiovascular procedures. Since joining the University of Bradford last year I have discovered the collaborative potential between radiography and engineering and reached out to some engineering colleagues to discuss potential projects to address ongoing X-ray research problems to be solved.

    One of the results of these was a collaborative relationship with Peter Twigg from Engineering. After a successful application for medtech funding to support a summer student engineering project, we had a prototype X-ray test object which addressed the needs brought to light by the IPEM group.

    Although I found the prototype seemed potentially useful and affordable for hospital physics departments, I needed to run it by my colleagues who have more day-to-day testing experience than me. I am an academic involved with teaching and research in medical physics and they are hospital physicists doing routine testing and troubleshooting, so there is a big difference between these roles.

    Given their busy schedules we made arrangements for a short meeting at the end of the workday (in hopes the patients would be finished with the X-ray machines) – only a few hours long. This secondment allowed for the funding of travel to these meetings.

    Test Object well-received at visit 1 of 2

    There are two key medical physics experts whom I sought to visit for this secondment, to bring the test object prototype to them in person, show them how it works and potentially view it under X-rays should an interventional X-ray system be available for use.

    Ian Honey works as a hospital physicist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Trust in London, UK. Nick Marshall, formerly of St Barts Hospital, London, works at UZ Leuven in Belgium and is now an active member of the European medical physics community.

    Both these experts have written IPEM QA guide books previously, and both have expressed their desire for a test object such as the one designed at Bradford. I should clarify that during my previous conversations with these experts they communicated what was required of the test object, however, they did not have any specific ideas for its design and how it would achieve its goals.

    The design by Peter Twigg is very unusual, different than any of the Leeds Test Object designs that physicists around the world are accustomed to using. For this reason, I did not provide any details about the test object prior to arriving on-site and opening the box. I only divulged its uniqueness.

    In London, Ian had 2 colleagues with him as well as a (dated) X-ray system to use for testing. The comments were very positive from all 3 physicists, generally foreseeing the test object as a troubleshooting tool for situations where clinical X-ray systems have had temporal blur issues reported. We spent a few hours testing the object using a range of clinically relevant experimental setups, and I captured both stills and videos on my phone (see attached).

    We all enjoyed ourselves and it made me proud to bring our design form the North to such a prestigious London hospital. Ian and Nick are very different from each other, though both very honest – so although I was very excited about the positive response from Ian I was very keen to see what Nick had to say before I let my excitement take off!

    Moving forward with the product design

    After my first meeting, I learned that it’s always worth ‘having a go’ at making something if you have the right people to do it! I was nervous about showing the test object to Ian, but it was well-reviewed. This is something I had never done before and it required a certain level of confidence in my own level of expertise in my subject area.

    Nick, for very different reasons than Ian, also supported the test object design and could see its usefulness should some further testing be done on a modern interventional X-ray system. He offered to do these tests at his site in Belgium in the coming months.

    Nick is one of a handful of medical physicists in the world who have access to unprocessed X-ray image data from an imaging system manufacturer, and this is a necessity for test object testing/validating. Even if Nick hadn’t liked it at all that would have been useful information to determine our next steps with the prototype – but what a fantastic result! 

    My next step is to meet with Peter and determine what our next steps should be to complete the design with the intent of turning the prototype into a commercially available product for medical physicists to purchase for use at their hospitals.

    We also plan to show the test object to the entire interventional X-ray physics community at a national meeting on 1st May. The organiser of the meeting has put aside a time for Peter to bring the test object to the meeting in the hopes of receiving more detailed feedback from its potential users to feed into specific aspects of its final design.

    There are 2 reasons why I really appreciate this secondment:

    1. I felt there was a definite need to show this test object to these 2 experts prior to anyone else and to do it IN PERSON. The travel was required in order to determine their initial reaction, and collect their suggestions for improvements and features to include in the design.
    2. I have no experience with ‘inventing’ a product, however, I feel I was well-positioned to communicate the requirements of the product. I have gained confidence in developing medical technology to address issues that I understand.

    I would recommend this experience to anyone in a similar position – go for it!

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    If you could benefit from support while progressing a medical technology towards commercialisation, or if you want to develop innovation skills then consider applying for a Translate MedTech secondment.

    Our latest call is open to applications, and further detail can be found on our website here. You can also contact Mohua Siddique with any questions you might have about the scheme.

  4. Learning the benefits of PPI

    Translate MedTech’s Secondment Scheme is designed to develop the innovation skills and translational capability of medical technology researchers in the Leeds City Region. This article is part of a series that showcases the impact that secondments have had on medtech research, as recounted from the secondee’s perspective.

    Due to the success of the scheme, it is being run again in 2020. To find out how to apply for Translate secondment funding for your medtech research, click here.


    Name: Patrick Lawson-Statham
    Host organisation during the secondment: Versus Arthritis

    Patrick Lawson-Statham is two years into his PhD research, looking at using decellularized tissue from pigs to regenerate a patient’s own cartilage following damage caused by osteoarthritis. 

    Through Translate MedTech, Patrick secured a 12-week secondment to Versus Arthritis, a national charity committed to improving the lives of people living with arthritis. Here’s what he had to say about the opportunity:

    “I heard about the secondment opportunity in the Research Liaison and Evaluation team at Versus Arthritis during a staff meeting and thought it sounded really interesting.

    After discussing it with my supervisor, Dr Hazel Fermor, I arranged to talk to Mohua Siddique, Translate MedTech’s Innovation Development Officer. She was brilliant, helping me put a strong application together.

    I had an interview at Versus Arthritis, and shortly after, Mohua let me know I’d been successful. It was a very easy, smooth process.

    The secondment allowed me to spend two days per week, with travel expenses, at the charity’s Chesterfield offices. I also visited the London office and had to travel up and down the UK a fair bit too.

    The Research Liaison and Evaluation team has a wide variety of functions, including liaising with Versus Arthritis-funded researchers across the UK and providing research information to other teams across the charity, such as communications and fundraising.

    Day to day, my role covered collecting, collating, translating and sharing information and data about funded research to whoever needed it, both internally and externally.

    I was also tasked with producing a booklet to encourage and guide researchers through the basics of incorporating Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) into their research. PPI is a key requirement of all research funded by the charity.

    This was a really interesting and valuable project. I gained experience and managed activities that I’d never done before – interviewing patients, writing case studies, organising photography, liaising with graphic designers to structure the content and layout.

    I’ve really enjoyed seeing how the booklet developed; in fact, while my secondment officially finished in July, I’m going to stay involved as it’s so close to being printed and I really want to see it completed!

    Having learned so much about the benefits of PPI, I realised that my own research lacked a PPI element, and have already taken steps to address that.

    I’ve spoken to a colleague at the university and we’re getting the ball rolling on involving a patient in my research. It’s definitely something that I’ll carry forward in my research career.  

    Before the secondment, everything I did was purely research-focused and in the laboratory. The secondment has given me a wider perspective of research and an appreciation of how the skills I have can be applied in my future career.

    I’ve translated research into lay language, run focus groups, worked with patients and delivered presentations, so it’s helped me communicate my research to non-scientific audiences much better. 

    I also learned a great deal about the grant application, evaluation and approval process at Versus Arthritis. Gaining insight from a funder’s perspective, together with my greater understanding of the importance of PPI, will definitely help me to strengthen future grant applications. 

    Overall, it’s been a fantastic and highly beneficial experience. I’m extremely grateful to Translate for enabling this opportunity to develop both personally and professionally. If another secondment opportunity arose, I’d jump at the chance.

    On the secondment, Dr Katherine Free, Research Engagement Manager at Versus Arthritis, said: “We find the secondments extremely enjoyable and valuable and they give researchers an idea of other career choices beyond academia and industry.

    Patrick was a joy to work with and he made the booklet project his own, bringing some really creative ideas and improvements to the table.

    The end result will be a valuable resource for many researchers around the UK, and make the research we fund more relevant to the ultimate beneficiary – people with arthritis.”

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    If you could benefit from support while progressing a medical technology towards commercialisation, or if you want to develop innovation skills then consider applying for a Translate MedTech secondment.

    Our latest call is open to applications, and further detail can be found on our website here. You can also contact Mohua Siddique with any questions you might have about the scheme.

  5. Gaining insight into medical device development

    Translate MedTech’s Secondment Scheme is designed to develop the innovation skills and translational capability of medical technology researchers in the Leeds City Region. This article is part of a series that showcases the impact that secondments have had on medtech research, as recounted from the secondee’s perspective.

    Due to the success of the scheme, it is being run again in 2020. To find out how to apply for Translate secondment funding for your medtech research, click here.


    Name: Dr Ruth Evans
    Host organisation during the secondment: S-Med

    Dr Ruth Evans is a Postdoctoral researcher at Sheffield Hallam University, where she’s working with Reza Saatchi, Professor of Electronics (Medical Engineering), to develop a non-contact thermal imaging device to help diagnose sleep disorders in children.

    Ruth has been awarded £1800 by Translate MedTech for a 3-month part-time secondment with S-Med, the UK’s leading supplier of specialised sleep diagnostic systems and services.

    We had a chat with Ruth about the technology being supported, and what her secondment will help her achieve.

    What clinical need does this new technology address?
    Investigating sleep-disordered breathing such as sleep apnoea in young children is particularly difficult because they naturally want to pull off the sensors placed on them which measure things like blood oxygen levels, respiration and heart rates.

    We’re developing a non-contact sensor using a thermal camera which can measure respiration by looking at temperature changes around the nose and mouth.

    When you breathe in the colder room temperature air, it minutely affects the skin temperature around this area, and when you breathe out the air around this area is warmer. It’s a really clever solution.

    Is your background in medical devices? 
    No, my PhD was in Physics and Astronomy and I was working with infrared data using a thermal camera to look at galaxies! 

    I wanted to apply my skills to something that was more immediately useful and my skill set matched with those Professor Saatchi needed to analyse and interpret his data.

    It sounds bizarre, but the technical side, the signal processing and data analysis, is the same – it’s just the subject matter that’s different.

    How did the secondment opportunity arise?
    Coming from a Physics and Astronomy background to medical devices, I’ve been on a steep learning curve. I attended several Translate training courses earlier this year and learned about the secondment scheme via their newsletter.

    I realised that this would be a valuable opportunity to gain insight into industrial processes and the regulatory side of medical device development.  

    Professor Saatchi has a long-standing relationship with S-med, which helps develop and distribute the devices that are currently used to measure heart rate and respiration rate in hospitals.

    They’ve already supported several of my grant applications and immediately saw the benefit of a fully-funded secondment.

    The Translate MedTech team helped with feedback to strengthen my application and I heard back really quickly that I’d been successful.

    What do you hope to gain from the secondment?
    It’s an incredible opportunity to gain a much deeper understanding and experience of what industrial partners need from us to be able to bring a new device to market. 

    The secondment will enable me to visit S-Med’s partner company, SOMNOmedics, whose production plant is in Germany.

    I’ll learn about the software that they’re currently using and work with the team there to find a way to incorporate the imaging software that I’m developing into the devices that they produce. I’ll also learn more about medical device regulations that govern new product development.

    I hadn’t considered doing a secondment before I saw the Translate opportunity and I haven’t even seen any other organisations offering grants for secondments.

    Without Translate, I don’t think I’d have had the opportunity or found funding to do something like this. I can’t wait to start.


    Finally, we had the opportunity to speak with Selwyn Sher, Managing Director of S-med, to discuss his views on hosting an academic secondment.

    “We’re always looking for unique, innovative technologies to retain our competitive advantage and collaborating with researchers like Ruth and her colleagues at the university, has clear benefits for all parties. 

    We’ve worked with plenty of universities and hospitals where they’ve used our equipment and technology for their research projects, but this is the first time we’ve worked this way round – using university expertise to help us design and develop a new product. Ruth’s expertise is perfect for assisting with this and the secondment will be instrumental in enabling this work.”

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    If you could benefit from support while progressing a medical technology towards commercialisation, or if you want to develop innovation skills then consider applying for a Translate MedTech secondment.

    Our latest call is open to applications, and further detail can be found on our website here. You can also contact Mohua Siddique with any questions you might have about the scheme.

  6. Apply for a Translate MedTech Secondment


    COVID-19 UPDATE | 26 March 2020

    The Translate MedTech secondment scheme is still going ahead, with the deadline for applications being extended until 12 noon, 3 April 2020.  

    We will be urging all awardees to follow government advice and only start their secondments when appropriate to do so. If you have any questions, queries or concerns, please get in touch with Mohua Siddique.


    Researchers developing medical technologies can apply for support and funding to gain fresh insights from new environments.

    Translate MedTech has funding to support up to 10 secondments to enable researchers to temporarily take up a role in a complementary organisation, or to host a clinician, healthcare provider, or collaborator from industry or academia.

    Applications to this scheme must support the development of innovation skills and/or the progress technologies towards clinical application.

    Secondment support on offer

    We can provide:

    • guidance and advice pre-application
    • help identifying a placement suited to your needs
    • an introduction to academics in other institutions
    • contact with clinicians
    • help to identify an industry specialist
    • up to £2500 to cover the cost of travel and accommodation

    Outgoing secondments provide an opportunity for academics, researchers, research students to broaden their experience, supporting:

    • The acquisition of new knowledge and skills
    • The development of new collaborations
    • Access to unique laboratories and facilities
    • Technology progression

    Host organisations can include:

    • Hospitals and other healthcare providers – supporting insight into clinical needs
    • Industrial companies and enterprises – providing an appreciation of commercial priorities, market drivers, health economics, manufacturing constraints
    • Innovation teams – offering knowledge and expertise in progressing medical technology opportunities
    • UK or international laboratories – providing training, access to equipment, and opportunities to develop collaborations
    • Technology intermediaries, including regulatory bodies

    Incoming secondments

    An incoming secondment may be more suited to your needs: allowing academics and researchers to host clinicians, industrialists or innovation specialists at their institutions.

    Contact Mohua Siddique.

    How to apply

    For further details, eligibility criteria and deadlines, download the Translate MedTech Secondment Scheme Guidelines and EOI Form.

    Closing date

    Applications to be submitted by 12pm 3 April 2020.


    About Translate MedTech

    The Translate MedTech programme is a partnership of universities in the Leeds and Sheffield City Regions with world-class expertise in the development of new medical technologies. Translate’s mission is to establish a sustainable community of academic, industry and clinical partners that are connected and committed to working in partnership to deliver a strong local economy and patient benefits.

  7. Translate MedTech 2020 Training and Development Programme announced

    Seven courses have been announced as part of Translate MedTech’s 2020 medtech innovation programme of learning, including a brand-new Business Case Planning and Pitching course where you can learn how to create a compelling business plan, and how to successfully pitch a commercial medtech opportunity to investors.

    Our training programme is delivered through a flexible, pick and mix programme of introductory, stand-alone workshops, designed to equip researchers and business development teams with the skills to translate research ideas into medical technology products and clinical solutions.

    The Translate MedTech Training and Development Programme is open and free to attend for PhD students, researchers, academics and business development staff in any one of the Translate partner universities (Bradford, Huddersfield, Leeds, Leeds Beckett, Sheffield Hallam and York).

    Places for industry and clinical representatives are available at a cost of £300 per person and can be booked by emailing Mohua Siddique

    See the full course overview below:

    NHS Strategy and Adoption/Market Assessment
    3 March 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This one-day training course will look at how to start innovating in the NHS context and will provide you with the practical tools to assess your research for potential in a healthcare setting.

    Using real case studies, we’ll explore how innovation works in the NHS, the opportunities and potential pitfalls to avoid when developing your research into something that can benefit patients.


    Intellectual Property for Medical Technologies
    12 March 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This training course will provide you with the information to confidently protect your technology, understand the differences between types of intellectual property, rights in property and ownership, and how to exploit them.


    Introduction to Data Privacy for MedTech Researchers
    17 March 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This training course will provide an introduction in how data protection and privacy should be used in the research and innovation process, how to ensure any personal data you will use from design to deployment is sufficiently protected and what ethical considerations you need when collecting data.


    *New for 2020
    Business Case Planning and Pitching
    24 March 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This training course will provide you with the insights and tools required to communicate a compelling commercial opportunity in a business plan and pitch that a team can unite behind and that prospective investors can support.


    Regulatory Affairs for Medical Devices
    18 May 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This training course provides an introduction to the regulatory requirements for placing medical devices on the market. It will help participants to understand the regulatory pathway to CE marking a device.

    As well as guiding delegates through the Medical Device Directive, this training course will provide information about other relevant guidance, standards and the new Medical Device Regulations.


    Patient and Public Involvement
    28 May 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This training course aims to raise awareness about the benefits of involvement, help researchers think about how and when to involve public, patients and carers, and offers researchers a chance to develop a plan for involvement through activities and discussion.


    The Role of Health Economics in Innovation
    11 June 2020, 9:30am – 4:30pm

    This training course aims to raise awareness of the role of health economics in the development of new technologies, and to help researchers understand how health economics can be used at all stages of the innovation pathway. It will also offer opportunities to gain insights into technology development through activities and discussion.

  8. Secondment Opportunity at NIHR Children and Young People MedTech Co-operative

    Are you a PhD student or post-doctoral researcher interested in learning about the new medical devices/healthcare technologies development process? Or gaining experience in providing expert advice that supports new healthcare products getting to market?

    Translate MedTech is offering an opportunity to work with the NIHR Children and Young People MedTech Co-operative (NIHR CYP MedTech) team.

    This Translate MedTech secondment opportunity is available at two days (or 15 hours) per week for 2 months, starting March 2020. The ability to be flexible with days would be advantageous.

    Up to £2,500 is available to cover travel, accommodation and subsistence costs. The successful candidate will be expected to work from the Sheffield Children’s NHS Trust and may occasionally be asked to attend meetings off-site with staff members.

    The successful candidate will support NIHR CYP MedTech in delivering their remit and work in collaboration with all stakeholders for the benefit of children and young people.

    This will include but not be limited to:

    • Support the activity of the TITCH network (Technology Innovation Transforming Child Health). TITCH is a national network of experts dedicated to transforming child health through technology and innovation (www.titch.org.uk)
    • Work with NIHR CYP MedTech to evaluate ideas for commercial potential and research/present relevant information about the opportunity to attract funding, partners and/or investors
    • Support a planned evaluation of medtech use (and experiences of) by children across the country, including the design and scope of any research undertaken in conjunction with our Rare Diseases Team

    About NIHR Children and Young People MedTech Co-operative

    NIHR CYP MedTech is the only MIC dedicated to child health and paediatrics. Our vision is to become a world class centre for the development of child health technology. We work across academic, industrial, and clinical sectors to support the development, clinical evaluation, and adoption of child health technology

    About Translate MedTech

    Translate MedTech is a partnership of universities in the Leeds and Sheffield City Region with world-class expertise in the development of new medical technologies: the University of Bradford, University of Huddersfield, Leeds Beckett University, University of Leeds, Sheffield Hallam University and University of York.

    Application closing date: 12pm on Friday 7 February 2020.

  9. Translate Summer Student Project blog: Ebeam treated polymers for sutures

    This post is part of a blog series about 13 short-term projects Translate MedTech funded in summer 2019.

    These Translate MedTech-funded projects let researchers hire students during their summer break to help develop innovative new medical technologies with commercial potential.

    Read these blogs to learn about the work they completed.


    Name: Hajrah Siddique
    Host organisation: University of Bradford
    Project title: Measuring the recovery force of Ebeam treated
    polymers for sutures

    My name is Dr Cristina Tuinea-Bobe and my research interest is related to development of bio-medical devices.

    The current project that Hajrah, Dr Paul Spencer and I worked on was the measurement of recovery force on Ebeam treated polymers for sutures.

    The overall aim is to create a shape memory suture product with “tuned” properties. Shape memory polymers (SMP) could replace conventional suture material in surgeries, especially minimally invasive surgery.  

    For example, after endoscopic keyhole surgery, stitching is difficult because of the confined space, and it is difficult to achieve a knot with the proper amount of tension on the tissue.

    The SMP suture tightens itself in the human body when triggered by the heat or fluid of the human body. Often the activation temperature in candidate materials is higher than the ideal, being just above body temperature.

    Ebeam treatment can change the activation temperature, and would avoid the use of additives that can leach out.

    During the Translate Summer Student Project, Hajrah tested two types of polymers with 3 different thicknesses, and recorded the SMP recovery force during temperature-triggered recovery.

    The injected moulded samples were Ebeam treated by Sherkin Technologies Ltd at the Daresbury Laboratory. Hajrah was trained in a range of material manufacturing and testing methods. The student learned data analysis techniques and to write scientific reports that capture the obtained results.

    Furthermore, she learned to manage her project, to communicate and work in a team environment, and enhanced her engineering skills.

    The results obtained from the student project exploring the use of Ebeam on polymers will create valuable preliminary data for a future grant that will successfully translate the product from research to clinical trials.


    You can learn more about this project and others at Growing MedTech Translation 2019 on Friday 6 December 2019, where each Translate MedTech Summer Student Project lead will give a presentation about their work.

  10. Translate Summer Student Project blog: Kidney Stone Pre-cursors

    This post is part of a blog series about 13 short-term projects Translate MedTech funded in summer 2019.

    These Translate MedTech-funded projects let researchers hire students during their summer break to help develop innovative new medical technologies with commercial potential.

    Read these blogs to learn about the work they completed.


    Name of student: Amin Nadimy
    Host organisation: University of Leeds
    Project title: Kidney Stone Pre-cursors

    In several of my taught modules I’ve studied the mechanisms of rock formation, and how rock-forming minerals collectively make up the composition of a variety of rocks.

    This Translate Summer Student Project on kidney stones interested me as it was an opportunity to look for similarities in the mechanisms of solidification in geological and biological systems.

    The approach we took was to reverse engineer the kidney stone, this provided an interesting  opportunity to restore the conditions under which the kidney stone had been formed, thus obtaining essential knowledge to the pathophysiology of  kidney stone formation.

    A challenge I encountered was obtaining ethical approval for my research, and I found that experiment preparation took much longer than the actual experiment.

    The experimental work was the most interesting part of my summer placement. The aim was to identify the composition of the “bridges” between the crystals in the kidney stone, thus allowing a test to be designed for tracing those “binders”.

    Without any preliminary information about the chemical composition of the stones, we were able to determine not only the type of the stone (cystine in this case), but also very interesting information about the microstructure of the kidney stone.

    The outcomes from the research will help to develop improved clinical and personal tests for kidney stones. If the stone nuclei could be removed at an early stage the benefits for patient well-being would be tremendous, and it would also result in financial savings for the health care provider.  

    This research has the potential to advance existing practice as it is an opportunity to monitor patients individually, and to react to the first symptoms of urolithiasis before they cause any pain.

    More questions were raised than answered during my placement, but they lay the basis for the future research required for the completion of the kidney stone pre-cursor test development. 


    You can learn more about this project and others at Growing MedTech Translation 2019 on Friday 6 December 2019, where each Translate MedTech Summer Student Project lead will give a presentation about their work.